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Nike - Risk Everything

FIFA World Cup 2014 – The Marketing

What a World Cup it has been, a record number of goals and a record number of tweets per minute . Here are some of the marketing and social media highlights and a few own goals as well.

Twitter got on board with their World Cup update, allowing fans to quickly tap into the live conversations around games. This may have helped contribute to a new tweets per minute record, set after Brazil beat Chile on penalties to progress to the semi-finals, making it the most tweeted about event in history.

Google also provided real time updates in search results, ensuring that fans around the world could check scores instantly without the need to enter a search result page which poses an interesting threat to publishers that feature live-scoring updates on their websites.

Google World Cup

Nike have had a very strong World Cup, their ‘Risk Everything’ campaign, utilising their brand ambassadors, Wayne Rooney, Cristiano Ronaldo and Neymar. The campaign was heralded with providing a huge boost in revenue for the footballing behemoth.

Specsavers came up trumps with a witty reactive campaign following from the Suarez biting storm. Many other companies managed to rapidly launch witty social media jibes after the incident but Specsavers effort was the pick of the bunch.

Addidas, and other sponsors, dropped the Uruguay star from their campaign line-up after the ugly incident.

I struggled to sympathise with the companies that made the ultimate gamble and sponsored England stars for their World Cup marketing campaigns, I think I laughed at the Mars advert the most, or maybe the terrible Joe Hart Doritos ad, or his Head and Shoulders one. I would like to see some research on the impact of the under performing England players had on their sponsor’s brands during their short World Cup and the response since their exit, my guess would be that these campaigns, like England, did not live up to expectation. It was quite comical to see one of the adverts placed literally minutes after the final whistle against Uruguay that sent the team home.

Perhaps the biggest own goal is that of FIFA, countless accusations of corruption prior to the World Cup starting will soon re-emerge into the spotlight with the tournament ending, with a number of brands set to take a stand against the scourge that is Sepp Blatter. Sony and Budweiser appear to be leading the revolt against FIFA’s blatant disregard for ethics and I only hope that their stance on this problem remains strong. Sponsorship money is a huge financial source that helps drive FIFA and therefore it is only withholding that sponsorship money that will help re-align the organisations morals.